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General

This manual offers you pedagogical content from scripts that cover a whole academic course to separate pedagogical modules ranging from 15 minutes to two-hour sessions. These are designed to support you in using Flinga in education. The scripts are made especially with teachers in mind, but also students who want to use Flinga effectively, for instance intheir independent teamwork, can utilize them. The aim is to provide you with a practical manual about how to get the best potential out of Flinga in various situations during a comprehensive and engaging learning process. The modules are divided into three general phases of an engaging learning process with corresponding activity-based steps that are crucial and common in the context of education

The idea is that you can go through the whole script to create a complete technology-mediated learning process or just pick some of the modules and perhaps re-organize them into a whole new process, up to you. As Flinga is online, most of these modules work also in modern distance learning/ e-learning settings, free of the limitations of time and space.

In addition, we have evaluated every step on how they promote the development of 21st skills and how the regulation and level of learning are emphasized in the activities (see more from Our theoretical framework).

Higher Education

This here is an example of an pedagogical script for using Flinga in a higher education setting. It is designed to cover a process lasting one academic course. To help you orient to the process we have written it with a frame story. Studying in higher education will most likely include at least the following educational configurations: mass lecture, small group lectures, collaborative teamwork and individual studying. Some of there might also be organized as distance learning, i,e. for instance, streamed lectures. In the following example these configurations are put together to form a comprehensive and contemporary learning process in the context of higher education. It consists of a planning phase, followed by three phases: 1. Activity and diagnosis, 2. Deepening learning process and 3. Reflection and conclusion. All of the phases also include specific learning activities.

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Planning phase

Professor Freeman is planning his next course of introduction to quantum physics. The aim of the course is to introduce the basic concepts and phenomena of quantum particles and their behaviour to the students. The course is divided, as usual, into mass lectures, small group lectures and students’ self-regulated teamwork meetings. Professor Freeman goes through the appointed aims of the course and outlines the different actions and resources needed for the learning process. As the topic of the course is open to discussion and different viewpoints, Dr. Freeman has been trying to spark up conversation in the previous courses. However, he has been struggling with trying to incorporate student activating methods also in mass lectures, as the students do not feel comfortable speaking out loud in such a setting. Only the most outspoken have been expressing their views, while the others have been quietly falling in apathy and meddling with their tablets and smartphones. This time he decides to try something new by incorporating Flinga –software throughout the whole course.

  • 1. Activation & Diagnosis 

    (4 steps)


    In the activation & diagnosis phase the goal is to activate the students prior knowledge and also to gain an understanding of their general level of understanding on the topic. In this higher education design it consists of four steps: STEP 1: Sparking situational interest - STEP 2: Activating existing knowledge - STEP 3: Activating lecture - STEP 4: Setting up research questions


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From his higher education pedagogy studies Prof. Freeman remembers the importance of activating students prior knowledge. It’s important for the teacher to be able to gain information of the students’ general level of thought on the topic, but it’s as important for the students to activate prior knowledge in order to accommodate new. Also, as especially in science subjects, some of the prior knowledge may be biased, so it is important to be able to diagnose and acknowledge these biases to be able to correct them. Moreover, as interest is related to knowledge, Prof. Freeman thinks that discussing of students prior knowledge and making that visible to others also would be a good way to spark up the students’ interests towards the topic.

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  • Step 1: Sparking situational interest

    Professor Freeman begins the course with an activating lecture. He starts the lecture with a captivating video about a quantum interference, which he thinks is a fascinating phenomenon and a good concept to get introduced to the theme of the course and to awaken students’ interest.

    Activity Instructions

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  • Step 2: Activating existing knowledge

    After the intro Professor Freeman advises the students to discuss together with others around of what they already know about quantum physics. Furthermore, he instructs the students to share the results of their discussion by using Flinga. He underlines, that Flinga is to be used in the end of the discussion, not earlier. After this the results of the students discussions that have been shared in the Flinga wall are discussed together.

    Activity Instructions

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  • Step 3: Activating lecture

    After sharing the results of the small group discussions, Professor Freeman thinks it’s time for some good-old teaching. He has prepared a presentation, usually however, many students are finding it hard to stay focused with the teaching and start falling in apathy. Also, when he encourages asking questions or commenting, none usually does. Thus, he plans also to use Flinga to keep the students activated during his monologue, and hopefully spark some conversation also.

    Activity Instructions

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  • Step 4: Setting up research questions

    In the ending phase of his activating lecture professor prepares the students for the deepening learning process. For this purpose the professor divides the students into teams and gives them an assignment to set up proper research questions regarding the course topic to foster and focus their becoming learning process.

    Activity Instructions

  • 2. Deepening learning process 

    (2 steps)


    In the deepening learning process phase it is about the hard intellectual work. This is done on both the individual and collaborative levels. In this design it consists of two steps: STEP 1: Collaborative knowledge building in a small group - STEP 2: Individual work. These steps can be repeated unlimitedly.

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During his career as a physics professor Freeman has learned that it is often beneficial to have students work collaboratively in smaller teams, where they are subjected to enquiry based learning, teamwork and guided towards in-depth processing of knowledge. He has been trying to find a easy enough tool for the students to support the students work and moreover making the students learning visible. This time he has planned to use Flinga as an accelerator for the collaborative teamwork endeavours.

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  • Step 1: Collaborative knowledge building in a team

    A group of eight students from Professor Freeman’s course enters a room specified for teamwork. Their aim is to seek answers for their research questions by using different kinds of materials using various sources of contents such as the internet and the library. At the same time, they need to engage in practicing both their self-regulated and co-regulated learning, as well as other crucial teamwork skills needed in today’s workplaces. They have been given one quantum phenomenon that they’re supposed to examine more precisely and present their synthesis later to the course.

    Activity Instructions

Flinga as an accelerator of collaborative learning:  Deepening learning process usually includes plenty of different small group sessions. Some of them are held with an instructor or teacher, but there are also sessions where the students work by their own without an instructor present. Either way, according to many students, the Flinga has two vital functions during a small group working process: 1. tool for collaborative knowledge building, 2. tool for awaking and fostering discussion and creation.

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  • Step 2: Individual work

    After the group session the students give themselves homework to accelerate their learning process. Each of the students is supposed to search for one research case where the group’s quantum phenomenon is explored empirically.

    Activity Instructions

  • 3. Reflection and conclusion 

    (3 steps)


    After the hard work it’s time for reflection and metacognition. In this phase it’s important to look back to your own learning as well as sharing it with others. This time this phase consists of three steps: STEP 1: Presenting results - STEP 2: Assessment - STEP 3: Feedback

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As the students have been working on teams around different topics, sharing the constructed knowledge with others at the end is important. Further, besides just presenting the results of their teamwork Freeman want’s the students’ to create some material to be shared with others. Also, professor Freeman knows, that successful learning, especially when it includes conceptual change, is not a linear process. In order to ensure what has been learned as well as providing breeding ground for now knowledge, he decides to provide the students with tools for collaborative reflection.

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  • Step 1: Presenting results

    At the end of Professor Freeman’s course all groups are supposed to present their work. For this purpose all the groups gather together in a lecture hall and Professor Freeman advices each group to open their group specific Flinga-session at the lecture hall’s main presenting device before the lecture begins. In the beginning of the lecture Professor Freeman opens the presenting device’s web browser where each group has now opened their Flinga-session in a new tab. He shows the session on the first tab and the first group starts to present their creation about a qualitative research method. And so it goes on until the last group has had its show.

    Activity Instructions

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  • Step 2: Assessment

    There is many ways to assess. This time Professor Freeman has decided to assess both the process and the outcomes. First he gave the students a quick test assessing three most foundational concepts on the topic. He then looks back at how the groups worked (he did observe the group work and made notes), and also collects self-evaluations of the group members. He then grades the outcomes (presentations) and finally, collects self-evaluations of the students own reflection of their individual learning on the course.

    Activity Instructions

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  • Step 3: Feedback

    At the very end of the closing lecture Professor Freeman encourages the students to give feedback of the course by using Flinga. Usually only some students give feedback, and not many dare to give it directly. For this purpose he opens a new Flinga-session and writes ”Feedback of the course” to the wall, encouraging an open discussion reflecting both the strengths and weaknesses of the course, as well as the participants’ own performance. He shares the access code to the student’s and advises the students to use their own smart devices for the task. He also reminds, that the session will stay active after the last session, so feedback can also been given afterwards.

    Activity Instructions

Read more about our theoretical framework!